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Conference speakers

Redesigning Justice: Promoting civil rights, trust and fairness conference to be held on 21–22 March 2018 at Keble College, Oxford

Speakers announced so far:

Professor Sophie Body-Gendrot
Sorbonne University

Sophie Body-Gendrot is Emeritus Professor at University of Paris-Sorbonne, Researcher at CNRS-CESDIP, Co-editor of The Routledge Handbook of European Criminology.

Sophie Body-Gendrot took her PhD in 1984 at the Institut de Sciences Politiques, Paris. During her academic career she has been visiting scholar at various universities abroad, including: New York University, Institute of Public Knowledge; University of Tasmania, Hobarth; New York University, Center for European Studies; European Consortium, Rockefeller Fellowship; Nucleo de estudio de violencia, University of Sao Paulo; and University of Washington State, Center for European Studies.

Her interdisciplinary research focuses on the nature of urban violence, tensions and conflicts and modes of regulation in a cross-national perspective.

Her work includes: Globalization, Fear and Insecurity (Palgrave Macmillan, 2012); ‘Violence in the City:Challenges of Global Governance’ in M. Kaldor and J. Stiglitz eds, A New Global Covenant. New York, Columbia University Press, 2013; Violence in Europe (Springer 2007); The Social Control of Cities? (Blackwell, 2000).

Professor Danny Dorling
University of Oxford

Danny Dorling joined the School of Geography and the Environment in September 2013 to take up the Halford Mackinder Professorship in Geography. He was previously a professor of Geography at the University of Sheffield. He has also worked in Newcastle, Bristol, Leeds and New Zealand, went to university in Newcastle upon Tyne, and to school in Oxford.

Much of Danny’s work is available open access (see www.dannydorling.org). With a group of colleagues he helped create the website www.worldmapper.org which shows who has most and least in the world. His work concerns issues of housing, health, employment, education, wealth and poverty. His recent books include, co-authored texts The Atlas of the Real World: Mapping the way we live and Bankrupt Britain: An atlas of social change.

Recent sole authored books include, So you think you know about Britain and Fair Play, both in 2011; in 2012 The No-nonsense Guide to EqualityThe Visualization of Social Spatial Structure and The Population of the UKUnequal HealthThe 32 Stops and Population Ten Billion in 2013; All That is Solid in 2014; and Injustice: Why social inequalities persistrevised in 2015.

Professor Martine Herzog-Evans
University of Rheims

Professor Martine Herzog-Evans teaches at the law faculty of the University of Reims, France. She previously taught in Nantes and Paris. She has a degree in public law ( Paris XI Sceaux, 1983), a certificate in European law (Paris I Sorbonne, 1984), and a Master plus in private international law and international commerce (Paris XI, 1986). She originally taught torts, family law, contracts, property law and commercial law. However, she later specialized in criminal law and more specifically in sentences’ implementation, prison law and probation. Her PhD thesis (Poitiers, 1994) concerned prisons and sentences’ implementation (‘La gestion du comportement du détenu. L’apparence légaliste du droit pénitentiaire’ : ‘Managing inmates’ behaviour through fictitious legal regulations’). Since then she has mostly published in these fields. However, she still publishes in other fields such as family law.

Professor Barry Goldson
University of Liverpool

Professor Goldson currently holds the Charles Booth Chair of Social Science having previously been Professor of Criminology and Social Policy. He is extensively published and he has presented papers at over 200 national and international conferences. In 2000 he founded ‘Youth Justice: An International Journal’ (Sage) after which he served as its Editor-in-Chief until 2015. Between 2006-14 he was a member of the Editorial Board of the ‘British Journal of Criminology’ (Oxford University Press) and he is currently a member of the Editorial Board of the ‘Howard Journal of Crime and Justice’ (Wiley).

He has been, and remains, an advisor/consultant to several major public bodies and/or research projects and he has provided expert evidence to a range of parliamentary committees, independent inquiries and international studies including: the United Nations Secretary General’s Study on Violence Against Children; the UK All-Party Parliamentary Group on Children; the Northern Ireland Assembly Justice Committee; Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Prisons; the Offices of the Children’s Commissioner’s for both England and Wales; the Commission on the Future of Multi-Ethnic Britain; Lord Carlile’s independent inquiry into the treatment and conditions of children and young people in penal custody and further independent inquiries/reviews into youth justice law and policy in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales.

Professor Nicola Lacey
London School of Economics

Nicola Lacey is School Professor of Law, Gender and Social Policy, attached to the Departments of Law and Social Policy and to the Gender Institute. From 1998 to 2010 she held a Chair in Criminal Law and Legal Theory at LSE; she returned to LSE in 2013 after spending three years as Senior Research Fellow at All Souls College, and Professor of Criminal Law and Legal Theory at the University of Oxford. She has held a number of visiting appointments, most recently at Harvard Law School.  She is an Honorary Fellow of New College Oxford and of University College Oxford; a Fellow of the British Academy; and a member of the Board of Trustees of the British Museum. In 2011 she was awarded the Hans Sigrist Prize by the University of Bern for outstanding scholarship on the function of the rule of law in late modern societies and in 2017 she was awarded a CBE for services to Law, Justice and Gender Politics.

Professor Elena Larrauri
Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona

Elena Larrauri is Professor of Criminal Law and Criminology at the Universitat Pompeu Fabra (Barcelona). She has been Fulbright scholar at the University of Santa Barbara, California, Alexander von Humboldt scholar at the University of Frankfurt and Visiting Fellow at the University of Oxford, All Souls College (2013-14). She is also past President of the European Society of Criminology.

Professor Ian Loader
University of Oxford

Ian Loader is Professor of Criminology and Professorial Fellow of All Souls College.  Ian arrived in Oxford in July 2005 having previously taught at Keele University and the University of Edinburgh, from where he also obtained his PhD in 1993. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society for the Arts.

Ian is the author of six books, the most recent of which Public Criminology? was published by Routledge in 2010 (with Richard Sparks) and has been translated into Mandarin. He has also edited six volumes, including Justice and Penal Reform (with Barry Goldson, Steve Farrall and Anita Dockley, Routledge, 2016), Democratic Theory and Mass Incarceration (with Albert Dzur and Richard Sparks, Oxford UP, 2016) and The SAGE Handbook of Global Policing (with Ben Bradford, Bea Jauregui and Jonny Steinberg, 2016). Ian has also published theoretical and empirical papers on policing, private security, public sensibilities towards crime, penal policy and culture, the politics of crime control, and the public roles of criminology.

Ian is currently working on a project – termed A Better Politics of Crime – concerned with different dimensions of the relationship between crime control and democratic politics. He is Editor-in-Chief of the Howard Journal of Crime and Justice. He has previously served on the Editorial boards of the British Journal of Criminology and Theoretical Criminology.

Professor Tracey L. Meares
Yale University

Tracey L. Meares is the Walton Hale Hamilton Professor of Law and Founding Director of The Justice Collaboratory at Yale University. Before arriving at Yale, she was Max Pam Professor of Law and Director of the Center for Studies in Criminal Justice at the University of Chicago Law School. She was, at both The University of Chicago and Yale Law Schools, the first African American woman to be granted tenure. Before going into academia, Professor Meares held positions clerking for the Honorable Harlington Wood, Jr., of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit and as an Honors Program Trial Attorney in the Antitrust Division of the United States Department of Justice.

Professor Meares has worked extensively with the federal government, having served on the Committee on Law and Justice, a National Research Council Standing Committee of the National Academy of Sciences from 2004–2011. Additionally, she has served on two National Research Council Review Committees: one to review research on police policy and practices, which produced the book, Fairness and Effectiveness in Policing: The Evidence (2004, Skogan and Frydl, eds.) and another to review the National Institute of Justice, Strengthening the National Institute of Justice, (2010, Welford, Chemers and Schuck, eds). In November of 2010, Meares was named by Attorney General Eric Holder to sit on the Department of Justice’s newly-created Science Advisory Board. And in December 2014, President Obama named her as a member of his Task Force on 21st Century Policing.

Professor Fergus McNeill
University of Glasgow

Fergus McNeill is Professor of Criminology and Social Work at the University of Glasgow where he works in the Scottish Centre for Crime and Justice Research and is Head of Sociology. Prior to becoming an academic in 1998, Fergus worked for a number of years in residential drug rehabilitation and as a criminal justice social worker.

His many research projects and publications have examined institutions, cultures and practices of punishment and rehabilitation – and questions about their reform. Most recently, his work has focused on the policy and practice implications of research evidence about the process of desistance from offending. He recently led an ESRC funded project, ‘Discovering Desistance’, which aims to develop the dialogue between academics, practitioners and ex-offenders about how criminal justice can better support people to leave crime behind. Currently, he is Chair of an EU funded research network on ‘Offender Supervision in Europe’ which involved about 100 researchers from across 21 jurisdictions.

He serves as Chair of the Scottish Advisory Panel on Offender Rehabilitation, and is a Trustee, Council or Board Member of several criminal justice charities including CLINKS, Faith in Throughcare, ‘Positive Prisons? Positive Futures…’, the Scottish Association for the Study of Offending and Vox Liminis.

For further information about the conference, call for papers, how to book, conference rates, sponsorship and exhibiting visit our conferenece page.

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